By Samantha Davis Isadora Moura Mota is assistant professor of history at Princeton University. Her scholarship focuses on modern Brazilian history, comparative slavery, abolitionism, literacy, and the African diaspora to Latin America. Mota’s first book, An Afro-Brazilian Atlantic: Slavery and Anglo-American Abolitionism in the Age of Emancipation (University of Pennsylvania Press, forthcoming), explores the role of Afro-Brazilians in shaping the history of abolition in the Atlantic world. You can read her article “Other Geographies of Struggle: Afro-Brazilians and the …

Interview with Isadora Moura Mota, author of “Other Geographies of Struggle: Afro-Brazilians and the American Civil War” Read more »

 By Samantha Davis Ryan M. Alexander is associate professor of history at the State University of New York College at Plattsburgh. He is the author of Sons of the Mexican Revolution: Miguel Alemán and His Generation (University of New Mexico Press, 2016). His research interests range from political violence and popular memory to circus culture and disease epidemics. You can read his article “The Fever of War: Epidemic Typhus and Public Health in Revolutionary Mexico City, 1915–1917” in HAHR 100:1. …

Interview with Ryan M. Alexander, author of “The Fever of War: Epidemic Typhus and Public Health in Revolutionary Mexico City, 1915–1917” Read more »

 By Samantha Davis Pablo Miguel Sierra Silva is assistant professor of history at the University of Rochester. He is the author of Urban Slavery in Colonial Mexico: Puebla de los Ángeles, 1531–1700 (Cambridge University Press, 2018). His research is centered on the experiences of enslaved people, mostly Africans, South Asians and their descendants, in the cities of colonial Mexico (New Spain) during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. You can read his article “Afro-Mexican Women in Saint-Domingue: Piracy, Captivity, and …

Interview with Pablo Miguel Sierra Silva, author of “Afro-Mexican Women in Saint-Domingue: Piracy, Captivity, and Community in the 1680s and 1690s” Read more »

Curated by Samantha Davis Thematic Collections are assortments of past and recently released articles in HAHR about key issues, events, individuals, or historiographical trends. These collections can be used as gateways into a specific historical subject, demonstrations of methodology, or sources for classroom discussion. As the world grapples with COVID-19, scholars and the public have turned to historical precedents of epidemic disease like the 1918 flu pandemic and typhus. The current crisis has prompted a wide range of reflections on public …

Historical Perspectives on Pandemics in Mexico Read more »

Ariadna Acevedo-Rodrigo is associate professor of history at the Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional in Mexico City and specializes in the intersections between education and politics. She is coeditor of Ciudadanos inesperados: Espacios de formación de la ciudadanía ayer y hoy (El Colegio de México, 2012) and Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico (University of Arizona Press, 2018). You can read her article “Paying for Progress: School Taxes, Municipal Government, and Liberal …

Interview with Ariadna Acevedo-Rodrigo, author of “Paying for Progress: School Taxes, Municipal Government, and Liberal State Building, Cuetzalan and Huehuetla, Mexico, 1876–1930” Read more »

Daniel Mendiola is a faculty fellow at New York University. His research interests include borderlands, colonialism, and conquest, with Central America’s Afro-indigenous Mosquito confederation forming the principal topic of his dissertation and first book project. You can read his article “The Founding and Fracturing of the Mosquito Confederation: Zambos, Tawiras, and New Archival Evidence, 1711–1791” in HAHR 99.4.

In the wake of recent events in Bolivia, we have asked some of the scholars who have published on the country in HAHR‘s pages to reflect on the following question: “What would you say is the key piece of historical context for understanding the contemporary political developments in Bolivia?” Rossana Barragán is a senior researcher at the International Institute of Social History. Her article “Working Silver for the World: Mining Labor and Popular Economy in Colonial Potosí” appeared in HAHR 97.2. …

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Kevin A. Young is assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His article “From Open Door to Nationalization: Oil and Development Visions in Bolivia, 1952–1969” appeared in HAHR 97.1. A coup overthrew the Bolivian government. The coup was spearheaded by the country’s racist oligarchy and backed by the United States, but it was also supported by portions of the Left, the labor movement, and the middle class. The latter groups had some legitimate grievances: for instance, the …

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Bridgette K. Werner is a postdoctoral research associate and lecturer in the Program in Latin American Studies at Princeton University. Her article “Between Autonomy and Acquiescence: Negotiating Rule in Revolutionary Bolivia, 1953–1958” is forthcoming in HAHR 100.1. On November 6, near the city of Cochabamba, mob violence struck against the mayor of the municipality of Vinto in the midst of increasingly violent protests following the October 20 elections. Opposition protesters kidnapped Patricia Arce Guzmán and burned the Alcaldía of …

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Carmen Soliz is an assistant professor of Latin American history at University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her article “‘Land to the Original Owners’: Rethinking the Indigenous Politics of the Bolivian Agrarian Reform” appeared in HAHR 97.2. Evo Morales: His Political and Economic Legacy Evo Morales first came to power in 2005 with the support of a coalition of multiple social sectors. His most important support came from the coca leaf growers (cocaleros) in the Chapare region. The cocaleros …

HAHR Forum on Contemporary Bolivia and History Read more »